Survey: Most Women Don’t Know Age Heart Screenings Should Begin

60% of women think heart screenings should start after age 30 - experts recommend 20

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Dr. Maria Carolina Demori examines a patient for risk factors of heart disease at Orlando Health. Women should begin regular heart screenings at age 20 that include checks on their blood pressure, cholesterol and weight. Women should also have a conversation with their doctor to see if an EKG or other heart test is needed to uncover any existing heart condition.

(ORLANDO, Florida) – A woman dies of heart disease every minute in the U.S., yet most women have no idea the American Heart Association recommends healthy heart screenings begin at age 20 to prevent developing serious heart problems. A new national survey by Orlando Health revealed only eight percent of women thought heart screenings should start in their 20’s, and 60 percent thought they weren’t recommended until after age 30.

“Atherosclerosis, cholesterol plaque in heart arteries, begins developing in our teens and early twenties,” said Dr. Maria Carolina Demori, a cardiologist who leads the Women’s Cardiac Center at Orlando Health Heart Institute. “If we don’t take action and start preventing the progression of that process, then it’s going to get worse. Eventually it will manifest as a heart attack, a stroke, or heart failure.”

Demori says women should regularly see their doctor by age 20 to monitor their blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and glucose levels. She also recommends having a conversation with their doctor to see if an EKG or other heart test is needed to uncover any existing heart condition.

“Women need to be educated and understand how they can prevent heart disease,” said Demori. “They are often busy taking care of their children, spouses and parents, but women need to find time for themselves. It is extremely important to know your risk factors and stay healthy so that you can be present for the ones you love.”

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Dr. Maria Carolina Demori examines a patient for risk factors of heart disease at Orlando Health. Women should begin regular heart screenings at age 20 that include checks on their blood pressure, cholesterol and weight. Women should also have a conversation with their doctor to see if an EKG or other heart test is needed to uncover any existing heart condition.

Erin Ziegler discovered she was born with a hole in her heart after suffering a mini stroke at age 26. She has already taken her two-year-old daughter, Jaelyn, to be screened for heart conditions.

The American Heart Association recommends women start regular heart screenings by age 20, yet a new national survey by Orlando Health found that only eight percent of women thought screenings should start that young.

Erin Ziegler works to keep her heart healthy after suffering a mini stroke at age 26. Like most women, she didn`t know she should begin screening for heart issues by age 20.

A new national survey by Orlando Health shows that 60 percent of women think that screenings for heart disease aren`t recommended until after the age of 30, but they should actually begin at least a decade earlier according to the American Heart Association.